Tax Carnival Ecstasy – June 18, 2013

Welcome to the June 18, 2013 edition of Tax Carnival Ecstasy. In this edition we start with an article by Jason Hull on tax accountants for your business. John Schmoll has a great post on retirement planning and saving for college together. Bill Smith takes a look at the online sales tax proposals that have been made. And we have an article on fake charities popping up after the recent events in Boston and how to protect yourself. Hope you like all the articles, bookmark, share, tweet, and like on Facebook.

Bill Smith's gold medal
Bill Smith’s gold medal (Photo credit: Waikiki Natatorium)

filing

Jason Hull presents Tax Accounts for Your Business posted at Hull Financial Planning, saying, “Don’t forget that if you own a business which is treated as a partnership for tax purposes, you’ll be personally liable for the taxes at the end of the year!”

retirement

John Schmoll presents Retirement Planning and Saving For College: Can They Co-exist? posted at Frugal Rules, saying, “Retirement planning and saving for college are both items that take years to save for. While it may not always be easy to balance the two, it can be possible to do so without sacrificing the other.”

John Schmoll presents How to Invest in Stocks When You Do Not Know Where to Start posted at Frugal Rules, saying, “Investing in stocks, or anything in the market, can be overwhelming for many. The key to overcoming that fear is knowing where to start and educating yourself so that you can set up an investment portfolio that’ll help you grow your wealth and reach your long-term retirement goals.”

tax law

Bill Smith presents Implications Of Passing A Senate Bill Enacting An Online Sales Tax posted at 2011 Tax, saying, “Congress is currently moving forward with a Senate bill that could place sales taxes on buyers who place orders for items housed out of state.”

taxes

Bill Smith presents TaxCaster: The Mobile Tax Calculator For Taxpayers posted at 2009 Tax, saying, “Tax calculators are popular tools for consumers these days. Before filing one’s taxes, a person can take advantage of a calculator.”

Bill Smith presents After The Events In Boston And Texas, Charity Scams Are Common posted at 2009 Taxes, saying, “When you use TurboTax to file your taxes, you may notice that you can write off the money that you gave to charities.”

tips

Cherry Liu presents 30 Blogs Featuring the Most Reliable Tips for Estate Shoppers posted at House Sitting Jobs, saying, “Real estate laws, taxes and investment options constantly change to reflect the state of the economy, which is why the smartest investors know stay ahead of the game.”

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of tax carnival ecstasy using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

More Sharing ServicesShare | Share on facebook Share on myspace Share on google Share on twitter

Technorati tags: tax carnival ecstasy, blog carnival.

Arizona Tax Attorney Aims To Save Customers Money

Seal of the United States Internal Revenue Ser...
Seal of the United States Internal Revenue Service. The design is the same as the Treasury seal with an IRS inscription. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tax payers often seek out tax lawyers so they don’t have to deal with the Internal Revenue Service alone. In turn, an Arizona tax attorney offer expert tax resolution services that often helps clients save money.

For instance, one satisfied customer said his Phoenix tax attorney offer detailed recommendations about how to deal with the IRS at a time when “we really needed help.”

The customer went on to explain how he relied on these tax lawyers experience to both resolve current tax bill issues; while also avoiding problems with the IRS in the future.

Reliable tax assistance

When it comes to the IRS and tax bills, many people hire a professional tax attorney to not only help them with their personal income tax and their business related taxes.

For example, one small business owner said he needed reliable and knowledgeable tax assistance because his business could not function under a cloud of IRS tax issues.

Thus, the business owner consulted with expert tax lawyers to sort out the back taxes that the IRS said he owed.

At the same time, people who hire these experienced and trustworthy tax experts for personal tax help say it really offered them peace of mind because they no longer have to worry about their IRS bills.

Features Of The Federal Free TurboTax

Features Of The Federal Free TurboTax

It is now possible for people to file their Federal taxes free with the help of Free Turbo Tax.  Federal Free Turbo Tax was designed with people having tax returns in mind, in view that they do not require a lot of tax guidance irrespective of their income level. The free edition provides an easy way of getting free tax preparation, by searching for the tax credits that one is eligible for to get the highest possible refund amount.

English: United States Internal Revenue Servic...
English: United States Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division Badge (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Federal Free TurboTax has several notable features, including guidance for first time users on how to complete their taxes. It asks questions in plain English then arranges the answers for the filer on the correct forms. It also skips the questions that do not apply the person filing the taxes, enabling him to finish the process faster. Moreover, it guarantees one to get the biggest refund possible.

The feature finds every credit that a person remitting his taxes deserves. Every year, many taxpayers get a lesser refund than they deserve since they fail to capitalize on the entire tax credits for which they qualify. Federal Free Turbo Tax has an audit support center that can be downloaded. It provides the taxpayer with guidance on what he needs to know and do in case the IRS contacts him. A notable feature of it that with it one can pay his taxes as he pleases, any time of the day. One can even access it without having to create a user ID.

Tax Credits For Your Home

2010 Tax Credits For Your Home

For those of you thinking of buying a new home but are not sure about the 2010 tax credits, maybe this will help you. If you are buying a home and your modified gross income is less than $245,000, the house costs less than $800,000, and you’re a first time home buyer, you can receive full credit. If your modified adjusted income is more than $125,000, you will receive a reduced credit. If your MAI is more than $245,000, you will receive no credit. Also, for those of you who are remodeling, you can also receive tax credits for your home.

2010 Guide To Home Buying Tax Credits

5 Tax Tips for Self-Employed Individuals in Any Field

Self-employment is like ice cream; it comes in a large variety of flavors. You can be a freelance writer, a graphic designer, a landscaper or a dog walker. Some people are self-employed full time, while others work part-time around their “day job”. Whatever your flavor of self-employment is, there are some definite tax tips you need to know.

If You Earn It, You Have to Declare It

If you do work for businesses, they will generally send you a 1099 form that you have to file at the end of the year. However, even if you work for individuals, or a business that does not send you a 1099 form, you still have to declare that income. Do not be fooled by thinking, “If I make less than $600 from one person (or business) during the year then I don’t have to declare it.” That is an often-misunderstood concept. The IRS expects you to declare every penny you earn.

Track Your Income and Expenses

You do not want to hand your accountant envelopes full of unsorted receipts and cashed checks come tax season. The accountant may miss some deductions because he or she could not find the right slip of paper. Even relatively inexpensive programs like Quicken work great. Keep track of all your hard copy paperwork and keep it organized as well. The IRS has very specific rules about business tax deductions and whoever does your tax return will need as clear a picture as possible to maximize your deductions.

Estimate Your Taxes

There are two ways to avoid being hit with a whopping tax debt at the end of the year. Either you have to be frugal enough to put away a certain percentage of every payment you receive, or you have to arrange with the IRS to pay quarterly estimated tax throughout the year. Most people choose the latter in order to avoid yearly penalties for underpayment. It may be tempting to spend all your money as quick as you earn it, but remember that just because no one took taxes out when you earned it, that does not mean you will not have to pay later. Estimating and paying your taxes is one way of avoiding having to file a tax extension form in the future.

Pick Your Name

If you are doing business under your own name, that is great. You just file a Schedule C form with the IRS and life is simple. However, if you are doing business under a company name, then you should have some sort of business license in order to avoid problems with the IRS. It can be a simple DBA (doing business as) license, but you want to make sure that you have all your legal paperwork in order before filing your taxes.

Self-Employment Tax

The IRS does charge a special tax rate for people who are self-employed. You will have to pay the self-employment tax, but you can deduct half of when figuring out your adjusted gross income. Form 1040 Schedule SE, available on the IRS website, will help you figure out exactly how much your self-employment tax will be.

Filing a tax return when you are self-employed is trickier than filing a regular tax return. Many people find that going to a professional tax accountant is well worth the initial fees in order to get the highest possible return they can. Unless you are very knowledgeable about business tax laws, you should keep yourself as organized as possible and seek the help of a reputable professional when it comes time to file your taxes.

About the Author: Annita Grosh is an accountant who specializes in working with self-employed invididuals. She loves watching as an idea becomes a workable and profitable business.

Should Millionaires Pay More Taxes?

Taxes are often an hot issue during an election. The 2012 presidential election is not any different than other election seasons. But no candidate has come under fire for his tax return more than Mitt Romney. Up until recently, he was pretty coy on the subject. He did promise to release his tax returns if he became the Republican nominee, and though he hasn’t secured the Republican nomination, he has released his tax returns for 2010, along with his estimates for 2011.

If you want to put your accounting 101 classes to good use, feel free to go through the 500 pages of documents yourself. However, his returns can be broken down into simple terms: Governor Romney has an annual income of approximately $21 million and is taxed at a rate of 13.9 percent. To put that into perspective, Newt Gingrich is taxed at 31 percent. Obama pays somewhere in the middle, about 25 percent.

So how does Mitt Romney get such a tax break every year? It turns out Romney is able to save so much green through his savvy business practices and his unique advantage over other politicians. Romney does not take in a traditional income. Therefore, he pays less in income taxes. Romney makes most of his billions through dividends, interest and investments. Because his money comes from capital gains, he is taxed at a lower rate.

People are understandably confused by the fact that millionaires are taxed at different rates depending on how they make their money. President Obama tackled this issue head on during his State of the Union address. He discussed a tax proposal called the “Buffet Rule”: If you make more than $1 million dollars a year, you pay a 30 percent tax rate.

The proposed tax rule is rightfully named for billionaire Warren Buffet, who has pointed out that he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. Like Mitt Romney, Buffet benefits from the capital gains tax. However, Buffet doesn’t see his unique monetary status as a result of savvy investing, but more fodder for those with the appropriate accounting courses to tackle complex tax structures. In fact, in the New York Times Buffet published an op-ed aptly titled “Stop Coddling the Super Rich.” In the piece Buffet tackled the issue of taxing the rich head on. He makes the statement that anyone who makes more than 1 million dollars in income should be taxed at a higher rate.

Clearly Warrant Buffet and Mitt Romney have different takes on how the rich should be taxed. Warren Buffet clearly believes that those who rake in significantly more money than the rest independent of whether it’s from income or investments should pay accordingly. However, Mitt Romney is perfectly happy with his tax rate—and wouldn’t raise it if he became president.

Jessica Reedy is a journalist with a degree from the University of Oregon.